855 Linden Ave.
Carpinteria, CA 93013

Art Tours

JOIN US - IT'S MORE FUN TOGETHER!

We visit amazing local and regional locations - galleries, museums, studios, shops, and more - typically on the first Wednesday of each month.

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SARA WOODBURN PRINTMAKING STUDIO

Wednesday - 11/07/18, 1:30PM-2:30PM

ART TOUR - Sara Woodburn - artwork - 20181107 - image from website 1 Channel Islands - Sara Woodburn

Sara Woodburn is a visual artist and printmaker who concentrates specifically on the technique of woodcut block printing.  She will host us on a journey through her studio where she will introduce specialty tools and conduct a brief demonstration of the etching press used in her limited edition works.  

Come tour this amazing place with us!

Members: $10  
Non-Members: $11

https://sarawoodburn.wordpress.com/woodcuts/

ART TOUR - Sara Woodburn Printmaking Studio - 07NOV18 - approved image

ART TOUR - Sara Woodburn - artwork - 20181107 - image from website 2 Cliff Dwellers - Sara Woodburn

Excerpt from the recent Mesa Artists Studio Tour:

My woodcut prints are inspired by my experiences in nature, as I hike through it or draw it, in places like the eastern Sierra Nevada (see right) or New Mexico (see Cliff Dwellers), my former home. I am particularly interested in the rocks, trees and elements in the landscape that are changed by both natural and human forces.  In addition, I have been fascinated by the overlays of color and pattern in Japanese woodblock prints and folk textiles. In my work, I combine those influences.  I do both woodcut and woodblock prints. Woodcut is the Western style of printing with a carved wood plate and woodblock printing refers to the Japanese style, or “moku hanga”, translated is wood print.

ART TOUR - Sara Woodburn - artwork - 20181107 - image from website 3 Warm Ocean - Sara Woodburn

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THE ARTS FUND COMMUNITY GALLERY - DUG UYESAKA PRESENTS

Wednesday - 12/05/18, 1:30PM-2:30PM

ART TOUR - The Arts Fund Dug Uyesaka - 20181107 - image from his Facebook page 3

Well-known and well-loved homegrown artist Dug Uyesaka will present his collages and speak to us about the method behind his madness when creating these masterpieces.  He studied Studio Art at UC Santa Barbara and is currently a teacher at Laguna Blanca School.

Located in Santa Barbara's Funk Zone, The Arts Fund is a community gallery that presents bi-monthly exhibitions featuring artists of all ages and backgrounds from Santa Barbara County.  

Come tour with us!

Members: $10  
Non-Members: $11

https://www.artsfundsb.org/funk-zone-community-art-gallery

ART TOUR - The Arts Fund - Dug Uyesaka - 20181205 - approved image
ART TOUR - The Arts Fund Dug Uyesaka - 20181107 - image from his Facebook page 1 A young Dug Uyesaka (from his Facebook page)
ART TOUR - The Arts Fund Dug Uyesaka - 20181107 - image from his Facebook page 2 Dug Uyesaka show at Architectural Foundation of Santa Barbara

Excerpt from The Santa Barbara Independent's article on the artist's show at the Westmont’s Ridley-Tree Museum of Art: 

Dug Uyesaka is a central force on the Santa Barbara art scene, and his solo exhibition long story short at Westmont’s Ridley-Tree Museum of Art is a milestone epitomizing the contemporary artist’s response to a sensationalized commercial culture. Known primarily for his work as an assemblage artist with a Rauschenberg-ian approach to subject and material, Uyesaka becomes more free-flowing when he distills his assemblage-driven works onto paper, playing inventively with typography and line.

This Westmont show captures his evolution as an artist and offers a compelling personal storyline, as well. While Uyesaka’s journey to becoming an artist and living in Santa Barbara follows the familiar American path of assimilation, it also reflects the notion of being “othered” in a very tangible way. As part of a Japanese-American family that experienced the trauma and injustice of internment during World War II, Uyesaka bears scars at his roots. The show — which spans more than 40 years of the artist’s career — includes early, openly political works such as “executive order 9066,” which illustrates a personal process of catharsis. Looking more closely, one sees that the majority of his later work responds to the complexities of the past, but due to his highly optimistic nature, this political side of Uyesaka’s “long story” is often less obvious at first glance.

Subculture-influenced typography frames narrative moments throughout the show, and the materials, which are largely happened upon organically or given to him by friends, create a visual feast that lets us see beyond Uyesaka’s signature eye for relativity and design. In the collage “Cover of EYE artist portfolio magazine circa 1980s,” hot-pink graffiti and ink droplets act as imposter poster board for masking-taped snapshots of sexual transgressions. At once eye-catching and racy, the work balances the electric charge of its subject matter with a stroke of irony, as Uyesaka employs a traditional Asian-calligraphy approach to ink the magazine’s title, EYE.

Two untitled collages from 2011 and 2015 play specifically to the audience of a post-pop art world. With his trove of Mad magazines and his calligraphic skills, Uyesaka bounces between a painterly approach and a dreamlike dazed-and-confused state. Major installations such as “the bride stripped bare” and “soft boom” seem to explore a long-forgotten dream of being a scientist, while suspended audio CDs and trumpets suggest the presence of musicians poised above the museum’s open floorplan. Through this expansive mid-career retrospective, one travels alongside Uyesaka as he imagines himself as something other than an artist; he muses on these alternatives, considering their processes and purposes, and then rounds the bend back to the reality of his life of creativity. 

In the end, a sense of serene optimism shines through long story short, thus placing Uyesaka’s work firmly within a tradition that includes many Santa Barbara–based contemporary artists. This inner sense of balance reaches a high point with “float — painting on board” (2007), a mixed-media composition that features a hand grenade neutralized by small halo-like washers in white that offset the weapon with an equally energized moment of calm. As is so often the case with Uyesaka’s art, “float — painting on board” shows both bittersweet sides of a single gilded coin.

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SALT CAVE SANTA BARBARA

Wednesday - 01/09/19, 1:30PM-2:30PM

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Pam McCaskey and her geologist husband imported over 60 tons of pink crystalline Himalayan salt from the famous Khewra Salt Mine in Pakistan. With it, they constructed the largest salt caves in North America.  Join us for a brief meditation inside the caves and a tour of their artistic and spiritually based products. 

Members: $10  
Non-Members: $11

https://www.saltcavesb.com

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Healthful Hangout: Inside the Salt Cave Santa Barbara

Nestled below the quaint steps of historic State Street, the Salt Cave in Santa Barbara are forged from 200 million-year-old Himalayan pink salt that seem to rise from the surrounding salt beds like some mythical village.  Created from the crystalized sea salt beds of the Khewra Salt Range of northern Pakistan, visitors are hushed into serenity of the cave for a rejuvenating experience unlike any other in the heart of the coastal resort town.  Visitors spend about an hour in the dim caves, relaxing on gravity-defying chairs, listening to calming music, and breathing in the therapeutic salty air. The environment is supposed to benefit one’s emotional state and ease respiratory problems, including asthma and allergies.  Former geologist Mike McCaskey and his wife Pamela, who has a background in fitness, are the owners and share their mission of providing a unique place to relax and experience the wonder of ancient crystalline salt through salt cave sessions, spa treatments, and products made locally.  Our salt scrub massages are signature to us and no one else in Santa Barbara performs the service. Other services include catered events, specialized salt scrub treatments, aromatherapy, reiki healing, sound classes, yoga and dance. We have had a wedding ceremony held in our large cave room. 

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(Article and images appearing on this page are from www.saltcavesb.com)

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THE GETTY MUSEUM EXHIBITION - SALLY MANN: A THOUSAND CROSSINGS

Wednesday - 01/09/19, 1:30PM-2:30PM

Art Tours - Getty Museum Sally Mann - 1
Easter Dress, 1986, Sally Mann. Gelatin silver print. Collection of Patricia and David Schulte. Image © Sally Mann

Our focus tour centers upon the work of photographer Sally Mann: A Thousand Crossings.  This is her first major international exhibition which explores themes of family, mortality, and the Southern landscape as a repository of personal and collective memory.  The day will afford time to roam the museum and grounds.  

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Sally Mann - Getty Museum image

Members: $50  
Non-Members: $55

For great detail on the tour, click HERE for a gallery of the exhibition, and see the below text from the Getty Museum's 09/18/18 press release.

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The Turn, 2005. Sally Mann. Gelatin silver print, 94.9 x 117.2 cm. Private collection. © Sally Mann

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Sally Mann - "A Thousand Crossings". Image © Sally Mann
 

FIRST MAJOR INTERNATIONAL OVERVIEW OF THE WORK OF PHOTOGRAPHER SALLY MANN TRAVELS TO GETTY MUSEUM

LOS ANGELES – For more than 40 years, Sally Mann (b. 1951) has made experimental, intimate, and hauntingly beautiful photographs that explore themes of memory, desire, death, the bonds of family, and nature’s indifference to human endeavor. Sally Mann: A Thousand Crossings, on view November 16, 2018-February 10, 2019 at the J. Paul Getty Museum, Getty Center, is the first major survey of this celebrated artist to travel internationally, and the first to investigate how Mann’s relationship with her native land, the American South—a place rich in literary and artistic traditions but troubled by history—has shaped her work. The exhibition is organized by the National Gallery of Art, Washington, and the Peabody Essex Museum, Salem, Massachusetts. The Getty is the only West Coast venue for this international tour, which brings together 110 photographs, many exhibited for the first time.

Mann’s work—photographs of people, places, and things—is united by its focus on the American South. Drawing from her deep love of her homeland and her knowledge of its historically fraught heritage, Mann asks powerful, provocative questions—about history, identity, race, and religion—that reverberate across geographic and national boundaries.

“Sally Mann’s distinctive approach to photographing the South has earned her a special place in the history of a genre that includes many of the greatest names in American photography,” says Timothy Potts, director of the J. Paul Getty Museum. “Her complex, evocative landscapes and intimate images of her family are reminiscent of classic work from the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, but she manages always to give her photographs an individual pictorial and emotive quality that makes them intangibly of our time. The work has a power – all the more impactful for its quiet and ethereal mood – that I am sure will leave visitors deeply moved.”

The exhibition is organized into five sections—Family, The Land, Last Measure, Abide with Me, and What Remains. It opens with works from the 1980s, when Mann began to photograph her three children at the family’s remote summer cabin on the Maury River near Lexington, Virginia. Taken with an 8 x 10 inch view camera, the family pictures refute sentimental stereotypes of childhood, instead offering unsettling visions of its complexity. Rooted in the experience of a particular natural environment—Arcadian woodlands, rocky cliffs, and languid rivers—these works convey the inextricable link between the family and the landscape, and the sanctuary and freedom that it provided them.

The second section of the exhibition – The Land – continues with photographs of the fields and ruined estates Mann encountered as she traveled across Virginia, Georgia, Louisiana, and Mississippi in the 1990s. Hoping to capture what she called the "radical light of the American South," Mann made pictures in Virginia that glow with a tremulous radiance, while those made in Georgia and Mississippi often appear bleaker. In these photographs, Mann also experimented with antique lenses and the 19th-century collodion wet-plate process for making negatives. Mann used similar techniques for her photographs of Civil War battlefields in the exhibition’s third section, Last Measure. Cultivating the flaws she could achieve with this method for making negatives—streaks, scratches, spots and pits—she created metaphors for the South as the site of memory. These brooding and elusive pictures depict the land as history’s graveyard, silently absorbing the blood and bones of the many thousands who perished in battles in Antietam, Chancellorsville, Cold Harbor, Fredericksburg, and Manassas.

The fourth section, Abide with Me, merges four series of photographs to explore how race and history shaped the landscape of Virginia as well as Mann’s own childhood and adolescence. Expanding her understanding of the land as not only a vessel for memory but also a site of struggle and survival, Mann made a series of starkly beautiful tintypes between 2008 and 2012 in the Great Dismal Swamp—home to many fugitive slaves in the years before the Civil War—and along nearby rivers in southeastern Virginia. Mann’s use of the tintype process— a collodion negative on a sheet of darkened metal that yields a rich, liquid-like surface with deep blacks – mirrors these bracken swamp and rivers. In these murky pictures, she conveyed the region’s entwined histories of sanctuary and oppression.

Mann also photographed numerous 19th-century African American churches near her home in Lexington. Founded in the decades immediately after the Civil War, when African Americans in Virginia could worship without the presence of a white minister for the first time, these humble but richly resonant churches seem alive with the spirit that inspired their creation and the memories of those who prayed there.

Also included in Abide with Me are photographs of Virginia "Gee-Gee" Carter, the African American woman who worked for Mann’s parents. A defining and beloved presence in Mann’s life, Carter taught Mann the profoundly complicated and charged nature of race relations in the South. The final component of this section is a group of pictures of African American men rendered as large prints (50 x 40 inches) made from collodion negatives. Representing Mann’s desire to reach across "the seemingly untraversable chasm of race in the American South," the series was inspired in part by the work of the choreographer Bill T. Jones. Lamenting the racism that has subjected African Americans to stereotyping, exploitation, and violence, Jones noted that “the body is the thing that . . . connects us, the body is bought and sold, and the body is definitely the thing that will divide us.” Mann sought to make photographs that address this paradox.

The final section of the exhibition, What Remains, explores themes of time and transformation through photographs of Mann and her family. Her enduring fascination with decay and the body’s vulnerability to the ravages of time is evident in a series of spectral portraits of her children’s faces and intimate photographs detailing the changing body of her husband Larry, who suffers from muscular dystrophy. The exhibition closes with several riveting self-portraits Mann made in the wake of a serious riding accident. Here, her links to southern literature and her preoccupation with deterioration are evident: the pitted, scratched, ravaged, and cloudy surfaces of the photographs function as analogues for the body’s decay. The impression of the series as a whole is of an artist confronting her own mortality with composure and conviction.

The exhibition is accompanied by a fully illustrated catalog, presenting an in-depth exploration of the evolution of Mann’s art, and two short films that illuminate the artist’s experimental and inquisitive approach to making images.

“Because the legacy of the South so profoundly continues to influence life throughout the United States, we are pleased to have the chance to bring this exhibition to Southern California. The artist’s meditative and meticulously crafted photographs encourage us to look more carefully at the places in which we live and the people in our lives,” says Mazie Harris, assistant curator of photographs at the J. Paul Getty Museum. “Her pictures encourage us to attend to the ways in which our sense of family, place, and history inform our perspective on the world.”

Generously supported at the J. Paul Getty Museum by Gagosian.

Exhibition Tour
• National Gallery of Art, Washington, March 4–May 28, 2018
• Peabody Essex Museum, Salem, June 30–September 23, 2018
 The J. Paul Getty Museum, Los Angeles, November 16, 2018–February 10, 2019
• Museum of Fine Arts, Houston, March 3–May 27, 2019
• Jeu de Paume, Paris, June 17 –September 22, 2019
• High Museum of Art, Atlanta, October 19, 2019 –January 12, 2020


About Sally Mann
Born in 1951 in Lexington, Virginia, Sally Mann continues to live and work in Rockbridge County. Mann developed her first roll of film in 1969 and began to work as a professional photographer in 1972. She attended Bennington College, Vermont, and graduated in 1974 with a BA in literature from Hollins College, Roanoke, Virginia where she earned an MA in creative writing the following year. 

She has exhibited widely and published her photographs in the books Second Sight: The Photographs of Sally Mann(1983), Sweet Silent Thought: Platinum Prints by Sally Mann (1987), At Twelve: Portraits of Young Women (1988),Immediate Family (1992), Still Time (1994), Mother Land: Recent Landscapes of Georgia and Virginia (1997), What Remains (2003), Deep South (2005), Sally Mann: Photographs and Poetry (2005), Proud Flesh (2009), Sally Mann: The Flesh and the Spirit (2010), and Remembered Light: Cy Twombly in Lexington (2016).

Mann’s bestselling memoir, Hold Still: A Memoir with Photographs (2015), was a finalist for the National Book Award. She has received numerous honors as well as grants from the National Endowment for the Arts, the National Endowment for the Humanities, and the Guggenheim Foundation. In 2011 Mann delivered the prestigious William E. Massey Sr. Lectures in the History of American Civilization at Harvard University.

PAST TOURS

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MUSEUM OF CONTEMPORARY ART, LOS ANGELES

Art Tours / Whimsical Wednesday - MOCA LA The Grand Photo by Elon Schoenholz, courtesy of The Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles
Art Tours / Whimsical Wednesday - MOCA LA The Grand Photo by Brian Forrest, courtesy of The Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles
Art Tours / Whimsical Wednesday - MOCA LA Brassai Arbus Goldin

In the spring of 2018, the Carpinteria Arts Center toured the Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles (MOCA), on Grand Avenue in Downtown Los Angeles.  There are three distinct venues of the MOCA located in Los Angeles - MOCA Grand AvenueThe Geffen Contemporary at MOCA, and MOCA Pacific Design Center - as well as Michael Heizer’s seminal artwork Double Negative located in the Nevada desert.

MOCA Grand Avenue hosted Real Worlds: Brassaï, Arbus, Goldin, an exhibition which brought together the works of three of the most influential photographers of modern life.  

Our tour participants greatly enjoyed viewing the works drawn from MOCA’s extraordinary collection of photography, and were fascinated by how these photographers used the camera to reflect and transform the world around them.  Look at these sites for Brassaï (pseudonym of Gyula Halász), Diane Arbus, and Nan Goldin to share that fascination.

The MOCA Grand Avenue location, designed by architect Arata Isozaki, is always a wonderful place to visit; it hosts the museum's main galleries and is the flagship location of the museum store.

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THE BROAD, LOS ANGELES

Art Tours / Whimsical Wednesday - The Broad The Broad, Los Angeles - photo by Iwan Baan
2018 Art Tours - Rebecca in Yayoi Kusama's Infinity Mirror Room at The Broad Rebecca Stebbins takes in YAYOI KUSAMA's INFINITY MIRRORS at The Broad in Los Angeles

In the winter of 2018, the Carpinteria Arts Center toured The Broad, a contemporary art museum on Grand Avenue in Downtown Los Angeles.  The museum was named for philanthropist Eli Broad, who financed the $140 million building which houses the Broad art collections. 

The Broad’s first visiting special exhibition, Yayoi Kusama: Infinity Mirrors, was the first institutional survey to explore the celebrated Japanese artist’s immersive Infinity Mirror Rooms.  

The Broad was the only California museum to host the exhibition.   Excerpt from artnet.com news: "The exhibition, surveying seven decades of the 87-year-old artist’s output, will feature no fewer than a half-dozen of her massively popular installation works, reports the Los Angeles Times. The so-called “infinity rooms,” consisting of mirrored rooms with strings of LED lights hanging from the ceilings, have drawn crowds around the world, with art lovers lining up for hours for a brief visit."

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WALT DISNEY CONCERT HALL, LOS ANGELES

Art Tours / Whimsical Wednesday - Walt Disney Concert Hall Walt Disney Concert Hall, Los Angeles

Art Tours - Marty Rebecca and Ellen at Walt Disney Concert Hall Marty Selfridge, Rebecca Stebbins, and Ellen Johnson enjoy Frank Gehry's sculpture “A Rose For Lilly" at the Walt Disney Concert Hall

In the spring of 2018, the Carpinteria Arts Center toured the Walt Disney Concert Hall on Grand Avenue in Downtown Los Angeles.  Home to the Los Angeles Philharmonic and the Los Angeles Master Chorale, this iconic facility seats over 2,200 people and was designed by Pritzker Prize-winning architect Frank Gehry, with acoustics by Yasuhisa Toyota. 

There are many things to see and experience on a visit there; click HERE for more details.  For example, hidden away in the rooftop Blue Ribbon Garden is a sculpture of a rose also designed by Frank Gehry.  He titled the sculpture “A Rose For Lilly” as a tribute to Mrs. Lillian Disney, who loved music and flowers.  The concert hall was conceptualized to resemble a bowl of roses, and so this sculpture fountain is a compliment to that vision.

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